FAQS About Advanced Learning Opportunities

  1. Does the new report card give teachers less incentive to challenge ALO kids?

    No, it does not. The report card is a communication tool between teachers and parents, and does not affect whether a student is challenged in class. Differentiated instruction is generated by student performance.

  2. Do all students at Bryant benefit from the ALO model?

    The criteria for moving a student to above grade level work is based on frequent formative and summative classroom assessments. Our teachers look for students who demonstrate depth of knowledge and advanced critical thinking and problem-solving skills, which indicates that they are ready for extensions.

  3. How do you make sure that ALO students are challenged and that there are high expectations?

    As test scores demonstrate for Bryant, our students are capable of high levels of learning. Our teachers find that they are often accelerating instruction given the capabilities of their students. Students are provided opportunities to extend their learning and demonstrate understanding of the content at grade level and beyond. For example, when students have demonstrated grade level mastery of a skill, they may work in a small group to extend their thinking led by a tutor or volunteer. They may be given new activities, projects or other forms of extension and enrichment.

    All of our teachers have high expectations for their students. They work hard to differentiate instruction to meet specific student needs.

  4. How does Bryant’s Science program compare to Spectrum or APP Science programs?

    The Spectrum program is only for ELA and Math, so a science program at a school that offers Spectrum classes for qualified students should look the same for both the Spectrum and non-Spectrum students. At APP schools, the science curriculum scope and sequence is actually different from that of non-APP schools. Some of the units are accelerated versions of the regular grade-level unit, some units are completely unique to the APP Science program and are not taught at non-APP schools, and some units (at grades 4 and 5) are actually middle school science units.

  5. Is there a “gap” in knowledge that Bryant ALO students experience when they enter and move through middle school compared with students from Spectrum or Highly Capable programs?

    Students in the APP cohort are working 2 years above their grade level in Math and Reading within the APP Program at Lincoln. Spectrum Math is accelerated by 1 year. Naturally there will be some catching up to do at any entry point if students transfer out of Bryant to APP or Spectrum programs.

    However, anecdotal evidence from parents and reports from teachers and administrators at both Eckstein and Jane Addams indicates that Bryant students are very well prepared when they reach middle school regardless of their Advanced Learning or general education designation.  In mathematics specifically, every year approximately 50% of our students qualify for 7th grade math or higher as incoming 6th graders. In short, Bryant students are prepared for whatever middle school placement their parents arrange.

  6. What are the criteria for moving a student to above grade level work?

    Students must demonstrate grade level mastery of the content they are studying by independently completing the assigned tasks. They are then given an opportunity to move to above grade level work that is aligned with the current content. This rarely means whole subject grade level acceleration, and it does it not only apply  to ALO designated students. Many of our parents choose not to test their children for advanced learning standing even though they clearly qualify, and many others choose to stay at Bryant even after their child has qualified for Spectrum or APP. Plus, students usually have strengths and challenge areas.

  7. What happens to Highly Capable designated students in high school?

    APP students matriculate to either Ingraham or Garfield. All others attend neighborhood schools and are served to their capabilities. There are many opportunities at all high schools to pursue a wide range of challenging academics.

  8. How often are ALO students assessed

    Once a student receives an Advanced Learning designation from the Department of Advanced Learning at Seattle Public Schools, they will retain that designation through 5th grade if they stay at an ALO designated school such as Bryant or transfer to a Spectrum or APP school. This designation follows them to middle school. Students may not test into the Highly Capable Cohort (formerly APP) after the 8th grade. Parents may request that their child receive an assessment through Seattle Public Schools that occurs during the fall of each year. More information can be found HERE.

  9. How many students have an ALO designation at Bryant?

    As of January 2015, there are 24 students who are eligible for the Highly Capable Cohort (formerly APP) at Bryant. There are 97 students who are eligible for Spectrum services. These families have chosen to stay at Bryant even though we do not offer either of those programs here.  There is a total of just under 600 students enrolled at Bryant.

  10. If a student tests into Spectrum or APP ranges, should they leave Bryant to attend a different elementary school or will their educational needs be met here?

    We believe that we offer a strong educational program that meets the needs of Advanced Learners; however, we recognize that this is ultimately a family decision. We hope that the above answers will help inform your thinking, and we encourage you to visit other schools and ask questions about their particular programs. We trust that each family will consider what is best for their own child.

  11. Are there any materials to help parents learn how to augment extensions and acceleration activities happening at Bryant?

    The newly adopted Math in Focus program has many extension activities that can be accessed from home, and our teachers offer each student a log-in code that allows them to access this information. Additionally, every student has access to Raz-Kids, a leveled reading program that allows them to read and interact with books at home and it informs their teachers of their progress. There are many other on-line resources for challenging students, and our teachers can recommend additional resources on a case-by-case basis.

  12. Where do ALO 5th graders go after Bryant?

    The Highly Capable Cohort (formerly known as APP) was recently divided, and students in the NE cluster of Seattle now attend Jane Addams Middle School while those in the NW cluster of Seattle attend Hamilton Middle School. Students who are eligible for Spectrum services attend Eckstein. Hazel Wolf K-8 is another option for families who prefer to have their children attend a smaller, alternative middle school.

  13. Why should my Advanced Learning designated student stay at Bryant instead of attending Lincoln or a Spectrum program in another elementary school?
  • Bryant has a strong instructional staff committed to student success.
  • Bryant has a strong administrative and professional office staff.
  • Bryant has a highly involved and capable PTSA that coordinates a variety of community events and provides stable funding for academic and other programs.
  • Bryant is a strong neighborhood school with valued traditions and programs.
  • Bryant has an aligned academic program with established continuity.
  • Bryant has a tremendously involved, and engaged community that only grows more connected over time with the benefits that brings for children.
  • Bryant has a vital and diverse after-school program that offers many rich opportunities for students to explore a variety of interests.
  • Bryant has LASER, providing a high quality, on-site before and after school program.
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